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Surface roughness evaluation

Optical profilometers are increasingly replacing tactile measuring systems. It can be assumed that in the near future, 2D parameters will only endure where their informative value is sufficient. 3D characterization of the surface with the aid of optical surface measurement technology not only offers better visualization of measurement data, but also permits more extensive evaluation options. Read more in the surface roughness whitepaper.

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Optical vs tactile surface roughness and texture evaluation

If the surface has randomly distributed features, the result for the roughness parameter is strongly influenced by the measuring position. In many cases, profile-based surface description is insufficient to provide information about functional behavior of the surface. Profile based surface characterization allows only limited information about the cause of poor functionality and so includes limited information for quality control purposes.

Areal 3D surface roughness measurement data

Three-dimensional, areal topography measurement is not subjected to those limitations. Not only does it provide an image of the surface that makes it easier to understand, but areal measurements also enable a function- and structure-oriented evaluation. Furthermore, 2D profiles can easily be extracted from the areal measurement data which can again be evaluated according to the common rules of profile-based roughness evaluation. In contrast to a tactile roughness measurement, optical 3D roughness measurement is non-contact and non-reactive thus avoiding any damage or influence on sensitive surfaces by the measurement procedure.

Areal surface roughness measurement data provides an easy and complete view of an entire surface. In contrast, a profile measurement contains only a limited section of the entire surface and is less intuitive.

ISO for profile and areal surface evaluation

The measurement chains for the areal or profile-based surface evaluation are described in ISO 25178 or ISO 4287, they differ from each other with some details.

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